Stanford Developmental Labs


List of Current Studies



These studies are conducted by Stanford Developmental Labs:
Social Learning Lab
, Language & Cognition Lab,
The Markman Lab
, & The Social Concepts Lab .

To participate, click HERE to sign up for an appointment.



Test

Why did you say that?

Social Learning Lab


Ages: 4 - 5



When teachers or parents say things like “that tracing is great!”, what do children actually think that means? In this study, we are asking how children respond to feedback depending on who it is coming from. For instance, do they understand that some people may always give praise no matter the quality of the work and that others may be a bit stingier?

In this short activity, children will watch videos of teachers providing praise to a student. Then, they will give advice to other students about which teacher to show their work to!

We are excited to see what decisions children make in this activity! We hope this work sheds light on how children understand the praise that they receive from others and whose feedback they seek out.



Test

Who Knows More?

Social Learning Lab


Ages: 3 - 5



We want to know how children reason about what others know based on the effects of their communication. Children will watch videos of “wubs” (puppets) trying to figure out how a toy works and communicate with each other. After the video we will ask which wub knows how the toy works!



Test

Noisy Classroom

Social Learning Lab / Language & Cognition Lab


Ages: 3 - 5



Do children understand that noise can prevent someone from understanding speech? In this study, we show children short video clips of a teacher and her student who wants to learn about some cool new toys in the class. But because the classroom is noisy, it can be hard for the students to hear what the teacher is saying. We are curious if children infer that the student might not understand everything the teacher says.



Test

Talk to your baby!

Language & Cognition Lab


Ages: 6 - 14 months



In this study, we look at how you interact with your baby. We will show you some pictures (e.g., colorful bubbles, stuffed animals, and food) and ask you to describe these pictures to your baby or an adult partner.



Test

It's a bird, it's a plane, it's a ... ?

The Markman Lab


Ages: 4



Help us decide what matches! In this game, we will look at pictures of different things -- cars, plants, insects, food -- and try to decide what matches. For example, does a plane match a bird or does it match a car? You will help us decide what matches what!



Test

Guess What Happens Next in the Story

The Social Learning Lab


Ages: 3 - 8



How do children (age 3–8) think about “smart” technology (e.g., Siri or Alexa)?. Do they think it’s a machine or a human? In a 15 minute Zoom session, your child will watch a video of a person interacting with an AI voice assistant or another person and then guess what happens next. They will also listen to a story about snack time in a classroom.


Test

Where Should Ryan Go?

The Language and Cognition Lab


Ages: 5



In this game, children will meet a boy named Ryan who loves to do all sorts of things. Ryan needs help deciding which of two rooms to complete his activities in. Children will watch 4 short videos and decide which room Ryan should complete each activity and then answer questions about what they watched. The purpose of this game is to understand how children develop language in noisy auditory environments.



Test

Let's Chat

The Social Concepts Lab


Ages: 7 - 13



In this study we'll read a short story with you and your child about protests against racism. Then you and your child will have a chance to talk about the story before we ask your child some questions about what they think! The goal of this study is to understand how children think about groups of people and types of social bias.



Test

Gus the Knight

The Social Learning Lab


Ages: 5 - 6



This study investigates what children think other people know about them! Children are told a silly story about a knight in a far away kingdom. During the story, the researcher will say some things they know about the child, and we are interested in how children react, such as if they question how or why the researcher obtained that knowledge.